When people in Pennsylvania get on a dating site, the physical attractiveness of the people they connect with may be one of the most important factors bringing people together. According to research, people are likely to contact others considered up to 25 percent more attractive than themselves. While individual ideals of attractiveness may differ widely from person to person, social beauty standards have a major impact on how people perceive others and not only in the field of romance. Still, many couples appear to include partners with widely variant levels of attractiveness.

Several researchers set out to assess how this kind of attractiveness gap could affect the future of a relationship, especially if it progresses toward marriage. Some studies found positive results. For example, an interview-based study of newlywed couples that involved both parties’ attractiveness being assessed by a panel of observers found that husbands were happier and more committed when their wives were considered much more attractive.

However, other studies found less positive outcomes. In some cases, the less attractive partner frequently developed controlling or jealous responses to interest in the more attractive partner. One survey of women who rated themselves much more attractive than their male romantic partners found that they were less committed and more likely to flirt with others. Since this survey relied on the women’s assessment of their attractiveness, however, it could also indicate a high level of contempt or dislike in the relationship. Both are significantly likely to lead to divorce regardless of attractiveness levels.

By the time people marry, their conflicts are more likely to center on deeper issues, like infidelity, differing financial styles or conflicting views on parenthood. A family law attorney may help a spouse to understand the divorce process and work toward a fair settlement on issues like property division and child custody.